Circular economy from an SDG perspective: A multi-stakeholder process for developing policy options

Based on a longitudinal case study (the UniNEtZ project in Austria), which includes a multi-stakeholder involvement, we investigate the process of developing CE policies for the Austrian Federal Government from an SDG perspective. Within this context, the main research question is how multi-stakeholder processes can enable the development of CE policy options. The study thus contributes to providing a structured approach of how different stake-holders from academia, industry, research funding agencies and government collaborate, how knowledge is created and transferred within this multi-stakeholder process, and what outputs, outcomes and impacts can be realized at the national level in the context of developing CE policies using an SDG framework.

by Schrack, Daniela; Hansen, Erik G.

 

The concept of Circular Economy (CE) is viewed to be a promising approach to help reduce global sustainability pressures. Besides political initiatives at the European level to advance CE, the United Nations (UN) ‘2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development’, with its 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) at its heart, explicitly includes CE targets. We conduct a longitudinal case study about a multi-stakeholder process for developing CE policies for the Austrian Federal Government. Our analysis draws on the theory of change (ToC) which refers to defining linear cause-and-effect chains from initiative implementation to societal impact. The findings cover a) a process framework clarifying how different stakeholders from academia, industry, research funding agencies and government collaborate, b) how knowledge is created and transferred within this multi-stakeholder process, and c) what outputs, outcomes, and impacts can be realized at the national level in the context of developing CE policies using an SDG framework. 


 

Get full article here [external link]

published: Recy & DepoTech, 11|2020
Keywords: Policy Tax Instruments, Sustainability, Climate